Tuesday, September 11, 2012

11 years ago...


 
Dear America,

I was twelve-years-old when I saw what happened to you.  I had a delayed start for school that day.  My mom and older sister were out for a drive as my little brother and I sat on the couch trying to watch cartoons.  It only took us a few moments to realize that something was wrong.  There was a building, burning, on every channel and we couldn’t even watch Arthur.  I knew something was wrong and I grabbed the telephone, calling my mom.  I couldn’t look away.  I can remember watching in horror as another plane hit the tower, and as the towers burned.  I saw the little figures jumping out of the windows and at first I didn’t realize they were people dying.

For days we watched the news constantly and people didn’t even try to shelter us children from what happened.  Teachers played the news in the background as the images were engrained in our small minds.  We mourned with you, not even fully understanding.

Eleven years have passed and I am not a child anymore, but I will forever remember.  You have been stained with the blood of innocent lives, and the dust of the Twin Towers.  You will never remember this day without pain and the fear that someone could hurt you again.  But don’t fear for us.   Your country has united and vowed to protect those living in this land.  We may make some mistakes along the way, but we will protect you.

I’m sorry that we were all hurt that day.  But we are not like wounded puppies, cowering under the name of what happened.  We licked our wounds and fought back, fighting for freedom.

September 11, 2001 will be a day of sorrow and loss, but we will remember those that perished, so they didn’t die in vain.  America, we are strong together.

Your daughter,

Krista

13 comments:

  1. This is a beautifully written letter. I'll always remember that day. I was at school when I found out. It was a month before my 16th birthday. It felt so strange knowing that, as I watched the news coverage in school that day, I was watching as my world changed forever.

    Thanks for sharing this.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you - I wrote it for my creative writing class last year. It is so strange to think we watched our world change on that day.

      You're welcome. :)

      Delete
  2. Beautiful, Krista. Here's just a little of what mine would read...

    Dear America,

    I was just a young mother that day; nursing my three-month-old son I watched what happened in disbelief and horror. As reality set in of all we had lost--family, friends, security--I looked into the big blue eyes of my son and cried. What kind of world would he live in, I wondered. Not the same one I grew up in, because we'll never be the same. Our country, our very lives, were forever changed that morning.

    Let us never forget,
    Michelle
    1 family member; 2 friends lost 9/11/01

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Michelle, I'm sorry. That would be terrifying to watch with your little baby. And that you lost three you loved.

      Delete
  3. That's a powerful letter Krista :)

    I was 20 years old and skipping a day at college. I watched the second plane hit the tower and all the ensuing chaos. I called my sister, she in turn called me the day of the London bombings saying simply "Turn on the TV." I could feel the horror from the other side of the Atlantic. The images are burned into my mind.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you. :)

      They are powerful images. I won't ever forget them - the towers burning and people running, covered in dust.

      Delete
  4. Krista, that is beautiful. Thanks for sharing your thoughts about a day that will never, ever be forgotten.

    PS: I can't believe you were so young when that happened. I was 19 at the time. Wow!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Julia.

      I can't believe I was so young either. It's strange to think my little sister and brother have no idea because they weren't born yet. It's something we will carry all our lives.

      Delete
  5. A very moving letter...

    On my side of the world it happened in the afternoon. We'd just got home from school, and I can't remember why the TV was on, because we weren't normally allowed to watch TV in the afternoon. Even far, faaaaar away from the US, it was horrifying to watch.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Rachel.

      That would still be horrifying to watch, far away too. It's strange how you watched tv that afternoon and we happened to have a school delay, trying to watch cartoons.

      Delete
  6. This was beautifully, beautifully written. September 11th is hard for me, 1) because of the attacks and 2) because while they were going on, my sister's best friend was receiving her death sentence that she had Leukemia...(she died when she was sixteen, after being diagnosed September 11, 2001).

    It is definitely a day of remembrance, and loss. But at the same time, hope. Hope that things will get better, hope that things will continue on, and that we'll learn from the past. (We, meaning humanity).

    As John Mayer once said, "That's why we're waiting, waiting on the world to change"

    ReplyDelete